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Old 01-27-2016, 03:04 AM
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What will it cost? she asked.

Cost? Let me see a good boat with oars will cost not less than thirty pounds.

The old woman sadly shook her head, and then walked away to prepare for dinner.

It certainly is a big sum of money, and I dont yet know how we shall be able to get it, old Tom said.

As he spoke I saw a boat pulling in with some ladies. I looked attentively and recognized my own boat. A minute later they were at the landing-place, and to my greatest surprise I recognized Mrs. Drummond and Sarah sitting in the boat. Tom called to me, and I came out to help them out1 of the boat. Mrs. Drummond shook hands with me saying: We are friends, Jacob, are we not?

O yes, madam, I replied, in a trembling voice.

I shall not ask that question, said Sarah cheerfully, for we parted friends.

I pressed her hand, and tears started in my eyes as I looked into her sweet face. As I afterwards discovered, old and young Tom had arranged this meeting for me. Mrs. Beazeley greeted the ladies, and showed them into the house where old Torn did his best to be polite towards them, and offered them a drink from the brandy bottle.

No, replied Mrs. Drummond smiling, I dont like brandy but I want badly a glass of water. Will you get me one, Jacob?

I brought her the water, and Mrs. Drummond entered into conversation with Mrs. Beazeley. Sarah looked at me, and went to the door. I followed her, and soon we found ourselves talking on a bench in the old boat.

Jacob, she said, looking into my eyes, you surely will be friends with my father?

She said my with such feeling that all my pride was gone and I replied:

Yes, Miss Sarah, I can refuse you nothing.

Why do you say Miss, Jacob?

Because I am a waterman, and you are much above me.

You yourself are to blame, but say no more about it.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:06 AM
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I must say something more please, dont try to make me leave my present job. I am happy, because I am independent, and I want to remain so in the future.

Any one can pull an oar, Jacob.

Very true, Miss Sarah, but I am sure to make my own living.

Will you come and see us, Jacob? Come tomorrow now, promise me.

You must not ask me to do this.

How then can you say that you are friends with my lather? I will not believe you unless you promise to come.

Sarah I replied feelingly, I will come. And to prove to you that we are friends I will ask a favour of him.

O, Jacob, this is kind, indeed, cried Sarah with tears in her eyes, you have made me soso very happy.

Mrs. Drummond joined us soon after, and said it was time for them to return.

And Jacob will pull us back, cried Sarah. Come, Sir, look after your fare, in both senses. Since you will be a waterman, you shall work.

I laughed and helped them into the boat. Tom took the other oar, and we were soon at the steps close to Mr. Drummond s house.

Mamma, we must give these poor fellows something to drink, theyve worked very hard, said Sarah, smiling. Come up, my good men.

I hesitated.

Well, Jacob, if tomorrow, why not today? The sooner these things are over the better.

I followed her. In a few minutes I was again in the familiar drawing-room. I looked round the room, and looked at Sarah. Mrs. Drummond had gone out to tell Mr. Drummond that I had come.

How kind you were, Sarah, said I.

Yes, but kind people are angry sometimes so I was and so was

Mr. Drummond came in.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:06 AM
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Jacob, he said, I am glad to see you again in my house. I was deceived then and was unjust towards you. I was greatly moved by his words and, remembering all he had done for me, burst into tears. Sarah cried too.

I beg your pardon, Mr. Drummond I have been wrong.

We both have been wrong but say no more about it, Jacob. I have an order to give, and then Ill come up to you again, and Mr. Drummond left the room.

You dear, good boy, said Sarah, coming up to me. Now I really love you.

I had no time to say anything because Mrs. Drummond entered the room, and a little later her husband returned. The conversation became general. Suddenly Sarah whispered to me:

What is the favour you wanted to ask of my father?

I had forgotten it at the moment, but now I immediately asked him to give me a part of the money which belonged to me, and which he had kept for me all this time.

I will gladly give you your money, and I shant even ask what you are going to do with it. How much do you need?

Thirty pounds, if there is so much.

Mr. Drummond went down, and in a few minutes returned with the sum. I thanked him, and soon afterwards left the house.

Didnt young Beazeley tell you I had something for you, Jacob? said Sarah as I wished her good-bye.

Yes, what is it?

You must come another time and see, replied Sarah, laughing.

Tom had taken a glass of grog below, and was waiting for me at the steps. We rowed off, and returned to his fathers house where dinner was just ready. After dinner old Tom continued the discussion.

The only difficulty, he said, is about the boat. What do you say, old woman?

The old woman shook her head.

If that is the only difficulty, said I, I can help you easily, for here is the money for the boat. I make it a present to Tom, and I put the money into young Toms hand.

Thank you, Jacob, said Tom, and when I say thank you, you know that I mean it. If I had the money and you wanted it, you will believe me when I say that I would give it to you.

I am sure of it, Tom.

Still, Jacob, it is a lot of money, and I shall work hard to pay it back to you as soon as possible.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:07 AM
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CHAPTER IV

I Save Drowning People. The Young Gentleman Appears Again

I shook hands with young Tom and his parents, and went down to my boat. It was a fine moonlight night, and the river was quite still. I continued my way up the river, turning in my mind the scenes of the day. Sarah was in my thoughts all the time, and I felt very happy. Suddenly my dreams were interrupted by a noise of men laughing and talking. It was clear that they were drunk. A large boat with five men in it was coming down the river. I listened.

I tell you I can throw an oar into the air and then catch it again, said one of the men, now look.

He threw his oar up in the air, but did not catch it as it fell. So it went through the bottom, and the boat began to fill with water.

Hilloa! Waterman? cried another, noticing me, quick, or we shall drown.

Their boat was fast filling with water and turned over before I could reach her.

Help, waterman! Help me first, Im head clerk, cried a voice which I recognized at once. I put out my oar to him, and he soon caught hold of my boat. I then tried to catch hold of the man who had sunk the boat, but he very quietly said:

No, damn it! there are too many people. Well sink your boat Ill swim on shore.

I picked up the other two drowning men, and they all caught hold of my boat.

Pull me in pull me in, watermanl cried the head clerk.

No, you will sink the boat.

Well, but pull me in, if not the others. Im the head clerk.

No, you must hold on, while I pull you on shore. We shall soon be there, and I rowed to the landing-place which we soon reached. The man who had decided to swim had arrived before us, and was waiting on the bank.

Have you got them all, waterman? he asked.

Yes, Sir, I believe so. I have four.

Everybody is safe then, he replied. I am very glad you have been so quick. Well, my coat went down with the boat, and Ill have to reward you another time.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:08 AM
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Thank you, Sir, you neednt do that. Just the same, give us your name. Now, Ill first tell you mine Lieutenant Wilson, of the navy. Well, lets have yours, that I may ask for it.

My name is Jacob Faithful, Sir, I replied, but if you mean to give me money, I tell you definitely, I shall not take it. I know one of the men and hate him. He had greatly wronged me once, but now I have saved him, and I wish for no better revenge. So, good-bye, Sir.

You are right, my lad. Thats the best revenge. Well, then I will not come, but if ever we meet again, I shall never forget this night and Jacob Faithful.

He held out his hand, shook mine warmly, and walked away.

When they were gone, I remained for some little time lost in thought. The sound of footsteps recalled me to myself. Soon a man came down to my boat.

My lad, is it too late for you to go on another trip? I will pay you well.

Where do you wish to go, Sir? It is now past ten oclock.

I know it is, but will you take me about two miles up the river?

I looked at him and recognized in him the young man of our night adventure. But I did not tell him who I was.

Well, Sir, if you wish it, I agree.

I pushed off, and began to row up the river.

Which side, Sir? I asked a little later.

The left, was the reply.

I knew that well enough, and I rowed in silence until we were near the wall of the familiar garden.

Now row to that wall, arid make no noise, was the order.

I did as I was told. He stood up in the boat and whistled the tune as before, waited five minutes, repeated it and watched the windows of the house. There was no reply, and nobody moved inside the house.

It is too late, and she is gone to rest, he muttered.

I thought there was a lady in the case, Sir, I said. If you wish to get in touch with her, I think I could help you.

Could you? replied he. Stop a moment. Ill try once more!

He whistled the tune again, waited another ten minutes, and then dropped on the bench in the boat and told me to row back again. After a minutes silence he said to me:

You think you can get in touch with her. Tell me, how will you be able to do it?

If you write a letter, Sir, Ill try to let it come to her hands.

How?

Leave it to me, Sir.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:08 AM
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All right, he replied, if you will do it, I will reward you. But she is so strictly watched that I am afraid it will be impossible. However, a drowning man will catch at a straw.

He then told me that there was no one in the house except her uncle and his servants, and they were watching her all the time. Probably, he added, she was allowed to walk in the garden alone. He then ordered me to be at the bridge at seven oclock next morning when he would send to me a servant with the letter. We had then arrived at Fulham; he landed, and, putting a guinea into my hand, left me. I fastened my boat and went home, tired with the exciting events of the day. Mary Stapleton, who had sat up waiting for me, was greatly surprised that I had come so late. She asked me a lot of questions which I did not want to answer, and she was angry with me.

The next morning the servant came with the letter, and I rowed up the river again. I placed it under the brick, and then pulled off to the other side of the river. From that place I could see the garden and notice all that passed. In half an hour the young lady came out accompanied by a servant, and walked up and down the garden path. After a while she stopped, and looked on the river. When the servant turned away, she moved the brick aside with her foot. Noticing the letter she picked it up eagerly, and hid it in her dress. Then she looked on the river again. I began to whistle the familiar tune. She heard it, and, turning away, hastened into the house. In about half an hour she returned, and, choosing a moment when her companion was not looking, bent down to the brick. I waited a few minutes when, both she and her companion went into the house. I then rowed up to the wall, lifted up the brick, took the letter, and hastened back to Fulham. When I handed the letter to the servant, he rode off with it, as fast as he could. That day I returned home very pleased with myself.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:09 AM
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CHAPTER V

Another Dinner with Mr. Turnbull. The Young Gentleman Makes His Appearance Again

The next day was Sunday, and, as usual, I went to see the Domine and Mr. Turnbull. I arrived at the-school just as all the boys were leaving it. The Domine came out after them, and I met him in the school-yard. We went for a walk. He looked sad and was silent for a long time as we walked along the road near the river.

I am growing old, Jacob, he said at last, nearly all my old friends are dead. You, Jacob, are the only man who is near and dear to me in the whole world. And I feel that although you are young in you I have a real friend. Bless you, Jacob; before I leave this world I want to see you prosperous and happy.

I am happy, Sir, I replied, that I can be your friend. I feel truly grateful to you for all your kindness.

We talked for a while. I told the old man that I had made up my quarrel with the Drummonds, and he gave me a lot of good advice about life.

Taking leave of the. Domine, I went to Mr. Turnbulls whom I told of what had passed since I last saw him. He was much pleased that I had made up my quarrel with the Drummonds. Then he spoke about the lady to whom the box belonged.

I believe, Jacob, he said, we shall now have that mystery cleared up.

I have not told the gentleman that we have the box, I replied.

No, but you told the young lady, you silly fellow. Do you think she will keep it a secret from him?

Quite true. I had forgotten that.

Jacob, I wish you to go to Mr. Drummonds and see his family again. You must do so.

I hesitated.
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Old 01-27-2016, 03:09 AM
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Yes, yes, I shall give you a good chance, without wounding your pride, Sir, Mr. Turnbull continued. I owe him some money, and I shall send the cheque by you.

To this I agreed, as I was glad to have a chance of seeing Sarah. I had dinner with Mr. Turnbull, who was alone because his wife had gone on a visit to a relation in the country.

When I came home Mary told me that Tom Beazeley had been there and that his boat was being built. His father had already given up the lighter and was now on shore very busy with preparations for his new work.

I had not yet started work next morning, when down came the young gentleman to whom I had sent the letter.

Faithful, said he, come with me. I must have some conversation with you.

I followed him, and he spoke as he walked.

First let me pay my debt, for I owe you much, and he put five guineas into my hand. Cecilia told me that you have the box. Why did you not say so? And why did you not tell me that it was you whom I hired on that night?

I thought that this secret belonged to the young lady. I told it to her and left it to her to make you acquainted or not4; as she pleased.

After all, I am pleased that you did so. It proves that I can trust you. Now tell me, who is the gentleman who was with you in the boat? I want to tell him all the facts in your presence. Then let him decide whether he will give the papers to Cecilias uncle, or to me. Can you take me there now?

Yes, Sir, I replied. I can, if you like. In half an hour we shall be there. The house is at the rivers side.

The young gentleman jumped into my boat, and we soon were in the drawing-room of Mr. Turnbull. I will not repeat the conversation in detail, but give the young mans story.
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Old 01-27-2016, 02:42 PM
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CHAPTER VI
In Which the Box is Opened

The gentleman who did not let me take away the young lady is uncle to both of us. We are, therefore, cousins. Our family name is Wharncliffe. My father was an officer in the army. He died when I was young, and my mother is still alive. She is sister to Lady Auburn. The father and mother of Cecilia are both dead. Her father went to India to join his brother, another uncle of ours. He has now been dead three years, and out of the four brothers there is only one left, my uncle Henry, with whom Cecilia is living. He is a lawyer by profession, and a rather rich man. My father, whose name was William, died almost a poor man, but still he left some money for my mother and me. I was brought up by my uncle Henry, with whom for some years I lived, and I was to follow the profession of a lawyer.

Cecilias father, whose name was Edward, left nothing. He had ruined himself in England, and had gone out to India to join my other uncle. The name of that uncle was James, and he was a very rich man. Soon after the death of Cecilias father my uncle James came home on leave he held a high situation under the Company. A single man, he was still fond of young people, and, after all, he had only one nephew and one niece to leave his money to. As soon as he arrived with Cecilia, whom he brought with him, he wanted to see me. So he stopped with his brother Henry, and lived at his place during the whole of his stay in England. But uncle James was a very cold andcapricious man. He liked me best because I was a boy, and one day he said he would leave all his money to me. The next day he would change his mind and say that Cecilia should, get everything. If he was angry with us he would say that neither of us should get a shilling of his money. Money was everything with him. He did not want to speak about anything else; he respected only rich people.

He expected Cecilia and me to respect him because he was going to leave us his money. We did respect him, but not because he was a rich man. So he was pleased with us on the whole, and after a three years stay in England he returned to India. I had heard him say to my uncle Henry that he intended to make his will and leave it with him before he went. But I did not know if he had done it or not. My uncle Henry does not work now, but at that time he still had an office where I worked. Cecilia was left with my uncle Henry, and we lived in the same house. We were great friends, and then, as we grew up, fell in love with each other. We often laughed at the capricious character of our uncle James, and agreed that if one of us got his money we would go halves just the same.

Four years after the return of my uncle James to India news came of his death. It was also said that he had left no will. Of course my uncle Henry received all his money as his nearest relation, and all the hopes of Cecilia and of myself were ruined. But the worst of it was this: my uncle told Cecilia that now their family was one of the richest in the country, and she should marry only according to his wishes. He also told me that I had better leave the house and find lodgings for myself. My pride was wounded and I left the house at once.

All this time the thought that my uncle James had made a will never left me. I clearly remembered what he had said to my uncle Henry before he sailed for India. There was a box of papers which my uncle always kept in his bed-room. I was sure that the will, if not destroyed, was in that box. I begged Cecilia to try and get the will. She promised. One day my uncle forgot his keys upon his dressing-table when he came down to breakfast. Cecilia opened the box and among other papers found the will of our uncle James. But women understand little about these things, and she was so afraid that the uncle might return that she could not examine the paper well enough. Indeed, my uncle returned for his keys just as she had locked the box and placed the keys upon the table. He asked her what she was doing there, and she made some excuse. He saw the keys on the table, and grew suspicious. He took away the box, and locked it up in a closet. When I learned what had passed I told Cecilia to get that box by all means. Luckily she found a key with which she could open the closet. We decided that she must run away from her uncle, and take the box with her. Then we were going to get married. You know, Sir, how our plan failed. I lost, as I thought, not only Cecilia, but the box which held the will of my uncle. Now, Sir, I have told you the whole story and leave it to you to decide how to act.
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Old 01-27-2016, 02:43 PM
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If you leave it to me to decide, I shall do it very quickly, replied Mr. Turnbull. Suppose I know nothing of the story. A box has fallen into my hands, and I do not know who the owner is. I shall open it, and make a list of all the papers in it, and advertise them in the Times and other newspapers. If your dead uncles will is in it, it will be advertised with the others. After this your uncle Henry will not dare to say a word.

The box was brought and immediately opened. There were all kinds of papers in it and among them the will of James Wharncliffe written two months before he left England.

I think, Mr. Turnbull said, that we may read this will.

We all agreed, and young Wharncliffe read the will. James Wharncliffe left all his money to William and Cecilia in case they married. If they did not, they were left 20,000 pounds each, and the rest of the money went to the first son born after the marriage of either niece or nephew. To his brother Henry James had left the sum of 10,000 pounds.

The will was read and returned to Mr. Turnbull, who shook hands with Mr. Wharncliffe and congratulated him.

I am so grateful to you, Sir, the young man said to him, but I am still more grateful to this clever fad, Faithful, and Mr. Wharncliffe shook my hand.

And now, Mr. Wharncliffe, said Mr. Turnbull, I dont think that we have to make this case public. Call upon your uncle, tell him in whose hands the papers are, and offer him your terms. He must prove the will, and allow you to get married. He is a lawyer, and he knows that he may be punished for what he has done, so he will be happy to agree to your terms. In the meantime Ill keep the papers. The will shall never leave my hands unless I decide to make the case public.
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